Posts Working for a manufacturing company? Share Your Experience.
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Working for a manufacturing company? Share Your Experience.

Yesterday I had a phone interview slash discussion with the CEO of href=”http://www.globe-soft.net” target=”_blank”>Globe Soft (I
later knew that he’s the CEO from their website, he didn’t introduce
himself). To cut the story short, the advertised position was for a
senior J2EE Developer, a few minutes into the discussion I recognized
that the company wanted a code monkey rather than a “senior” staff (href=”http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2005/11/great_marketers.html”
target=”_blank”>“senior” is indeed a generic word). As I was
basically too expensive for the position (around 150% of their pay
range) he followed a negotiation strategy along the lines of:

  • Industry average [for a code monkey] is around half of what you’re getting.
  • You’d gain a very good experience working on that project.
  • You have only X years and these are valued at Y value (proportional)
  • You currently work at a manufacturing company.

<shameless plug>Despite the fact that he was trying to buy low with some unconvincing arguments, and that I didn’t sell myself too hard by neither stressing the couple
of Master’s degrees + 8 years sound experience working for both large and small organizations, nor mentioning the consultancy spot jobs, knowledge, passion, etc…</shameless plug> I should stop at one of his points:

“Working for a manufacturing company”.

I’ve heard the argument before, and I have to agree that working in an industrial/manufacturing company could sound like an “ordinary” life
for a developer. IMO this should not carry the impression that such an environment results in an experience-less time (for the lack of
a better wording). As a matter of fact, one of the key drivers to my love for my profession is that I experience, first hand, how the IT (and more
specifically development) could shape up a business and how they could transfer it from a state to a better one. I also, on a daily basis, HAVE TO deal with the good, bad, failed, unrecognized implementations.

With this in mind, It’s impossible to deny the gains:

  • Being immersed in user experiences
  • Understanding and valuing the meaning of agility
  • Gaining domain knowledge
  • Dealing with a plethora of personalities with various level of expertise, cultures.
  • Always finding Improvements for current solutions (as the interface with
    customer/client never ends).

Unfortunately, I only came across a few (in fact one) who shared a similar experience during his career.
So, If you have worked/been working in an Industrial/Manufacturing environment, I’d really appreciate hearing from you.

As always, a wonderful learning experience and a true gain.

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